Nancy Greene

Canada’s skiing sensation!

 

Nancy_at_Sun_Peaks_in_2000Nancy Greene is one of the best known names in Canadian skiing. Her success at the 1968 Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France made a lasting impression on Canadian skiers and non-skiers alike, and Nancy has stayed in the public eye ever since.

Nancy was born in Ottawa on May 11, 1943 but has always considered herself to be from British Columbia. Both Nancy’s parents were from B.C., and her father was ‘on loan to the Government’ during the war when she was born. After the war, the Greene family returned to the Kootenays where Nancy grew up in Rossland and did her early skiing on Red Mountain. Nancy and her two sisters and three brothers all skied from the age of three. Her parents were both avid skiers and were founding members of the Red Mountain Ski Club.

Career

Nicknamed “Tiger” because of her ‘go for it’ attitude and her aggressive style of skiing, she won the Canadian ski championship nine times and the United States championship three times. In 1967, Nancy Greene broke the European domination of the sport, winning the inaugural World Cup. That year she won seven of 16 events, taking the over-all title nancy green, slolomwith four giant slalom victories plus two in slalom and one in downhill. Her accomplishment earned her Canadian “Athlete of the Year” honours.

In 1968 she won the World Cup title again plus, at the Winter Olympic Games in Grenoble, France, she captured a gold medal in the giant slalom, by one of the largest margins in Olympic history, and a silver medal in the slalom. For the second time, she was named Canada’s “Athlete of the Year.”

Following her retirement from competition, she made a major contribution to Canadian sport by accepting an appointment to the federal Government’s “Task Force on Sport For Canadians.” During this period Greene also did promotional work for various companies including Rossignol, Pontiac and Mars Inc. In a 1970’s television commercial for the latter product she was seen to discard the wrapper onto a ski slope in the course of consuming the product. This minor act, coming at a time of nascent environmental sentiment, appears to have entered the public memory as references to it have dogged her over the years.

Married with twin boys, Nancy Greene and her husband Al Raine were instrumental in the early development of the Whistler-Blackcomb Resort in Whistler, British Columbia, and then later in the development and promotion of skiing at Sun Peaks Resort, just north of Kamloops, British Columbia. The expansion of the resort was not without controversy as some Native groups opposed the move, and protesters occupying the new site were removed by arrest under a provincial injunction.[2] Nancy is Director of Skiing at Sun Peaks Resort and skis almost every day. Nancy and Al built Nancy Greene’s Cahilty Lodge where they make their home. Dedicated to the promotion of her sport for more than 30 years, the Nancy Greene Ski League has been an important entry-level race program for young children.

Over the years, Nancy Greene has been the recipient of numerous awards including her country’s highest civilian honour, the Order of Canada. She has been honoured with the naming of “Nancy Greene Provincial Park” and “Nancy Greene Lake” in the Monashee Mountains of British Columbia’s Kootenay region. A stretch of Capilano Road in North Vancouver was renamed Nancy Greene Way. In 1999, her name was engraved in Canada’s Walk of Fame and she was voted Canada’s female athlete of the century in a survey of newspaper editors and broadcasters conducted by The Canadian Press and Broadcast News.

 

Source: “Nancy Greene, a short biography

Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Greene

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